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Where do you live?

Où habites vous?


He wants to know where he lives.
Il veut savoir où vous habitez.


I live in France.
Je vis en France.

I do live in France.
We could say the above the just to emphasis on your statement.
How do I say it in French? I guess the French word 'vraiment' is needed.

Please comments on my question.
 



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I think you can say "Je vis bien en France" . But I also think the emphasis may be a little stronger in French than in the  corresponding English phrase ("I do live in France") .

Also "Je vis bien en France" would normally mean "I live well in France" but ,as I say in certain contexts it might mean "Yes, I do live in France"

By the way  it should be  "Où habitez- vous?"

Où habitez vous?

Il veut savoir où il habite.

J'habite en France.

et aussi "J'habite en France"

Pour "I live" et "I do live" utilisez le meme conjugation: J'habite en France.

Two verbs exist that translate 'to live": vivre and habitez. Vivre is for 'living a life' and habiter is used for 'living some place; a country, a city, an apartment, a house, on a particular street, etc.

Thanks for the replies.

I apologize to him.   Je m'excuse ...

I do apologize to him.

In the second sentence I emphasis the apology or rather it is a bit stronger apology.

How do you write the two different sentence is my question?

I know French uses the word excuser and s'excuser. 

I know French people say 'Je suis désolé. 

This is less strong, I think. 

Je suis désolé means I am sorry. I may be wrong!

To say I am sorry is less stronger than I apologize to him

Now we are getting into pronoun word order.  I would say Je lui m'excuse for "I apologize to him".  It literally translates as "I to him excuse myself."  If I am wrong, perhaps someone out there can correct it?

Again, English has the two constructions, but French only has the one.

Yes , you have got in a bit of a tangle ; ) .

Well  the order is always going to be "me" followed by "lui" (I learned that at school by rote  and have forgotten all the rules attaching to the order of those personal pronouns. )

And to add to that I don't think you would say "je me lui excuse " either since I am fairly sure it would be better to say "je m'excuse a lui".(though that  also sounds very clumsy to my ears)

 I would not be inclined to use "s'excuser"  with an indirect object  . I would  personally use an expression like "faire mes excuses"

And so I would say it this way:

"Je lui fais mes excuses" and ,perhaps "je dois lui faire mes excuses" if I wanted to be more emphatic.

As always , my attempts are not those of a native speaker and so they will have to be taken with a pinch of salt. 

Thanks, George.

he wants to know where he lives = il veut savoir où il vit (ou habite)

i do live in France = je vis vraiment en France.

To give you the view of a native speaker, I don't think this particular use of "do" is translatable in French :/

I live in France - I do live in France.

"J'habite en France" is an answer to the question : "ou habitez vous ?" "dans quel pays habitez vous ?"

"J'habite bien en France" or "J'habite vraiment en France" is a confirmation to the specific question "habitez-vous en France?" or (grammatically incorrect but often used) "vous habitez vraiment en France ?"

In my understanding of English "do" is just a way to make the affirmation a bit stronger. .... There is no way to convert this in french. The addition of "bien" or "vraiment" as translation of "do" change the meaning of the phrase.

Answering : "J'habite bien en France" to the question "Ou habitez vous ?" will sound very strange to a native speaker because it's not the adequate answer, you are confirming something that wasn't introduced in the question...

This is just my opinion of course ^^

Nous vous remercions pour votre explication.

In my understanding of English "do" is just a way to make the affirmation a bit stronger. .... There is no way to convert this in french. The addition of "bien" or "vraiment" as translation of "do" change the meaning of the phrase.

In my understanding of English "do" is just a way to make the affirmation a bit stronger. .... There is no way to convert this in French. The addition of "bien" or "vraiment" as translation of "do" change the meaning of the phrase.

(Sandra, the English word French must start with capital F because it is a proper noun.)

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