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What is the French for:

  • day before yesterday
  • day after tomorrow
  • week before last
  • week after next

Thanks!

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one more question.

is it

Je suis allé à Paris avant-hier.

or

Je suis allé à Paris l'avant-hier.

is it

Je vais à Paris après-demain.

or

Je vais à Paris l'après-demain.

 

Je suis allé à Paris avant hier.

Je vais à Paris après-demain.

By the the way you may also come across funny expressions like:

jeudi en 8 (next Thursday) Je pars jeudi en 8 (I'm leaving next Thursday)

or

jeudi en 15 (in two weeks from now)

Don't forget if you are a women or a man.

If you are a women :

Je suis allée à Paris avant-hier.

This rule is only use with the verb "être".

Jennifer a mangé une pomme hier.

John a mangé une pomme hier.

It's a very difficult rule, last example :

Jennifer a été emportée par le vent.

John a été emporté par le vent.

The verb "emporter" is after the verb "être", so you need to use the rule girl/boy.

Sorry we shouldn't write 8 but huit and not 15 but quinze

Thank you, thank you!  I learned a lot from this conversation!

Do you know "le lendemain"

eg  J'ai un examen le lendemain de mon mariage =I have an exam the day after my wedding

 

and "la veille" = "the day before"

thanks.  i had forgotten about those.   Would it be correct to say:

la veille de mon départ pour paris

and

le lendemain de mon retour de Paris

Yes both sentences are correct

 The second one sounds right.

I am not sure if "la veille "  means "the day before" or "the night before" but otherwise  the first one sounds OK to me as well. 

Yes it may be quite confusing : la veille means the day before, la veille au soir means the evening before but veiller can mean to stay up, une nuit de veille: to be up all night...veille/ waking

The english equivalent "vigil" has the same meanings:

  the evening before ("I'm going to the vigil Mass on Saturday")

  the day before ("I'll get up early on Christmas Eve")

  a wakeful night ("His mother kept vigil beside his deathbed")

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