French Language

Discuss and learn French: French vocabulary, French grammar, French culture etc.

French Vocab Games app for iPhone/iPad French-English dictionary French grammar French vocab/phrases

For the latest updates, follow @FrenchUpdates on Twitter!

solliciter

the word is new to me.  the dictionary says u “solliciter info” and “solliciter un emploi."  I think I saw it used to ask for a favor.  I know “asking a favor” as “demander une service." i see there's also "demander une faveur" but i never encountered this.  pls address this as well.    

in english, only educated people use it -- to solicit someone's opinion or ideas.  i've never used it.  it's also seen on signs -- "no soliciting" w regard to prostitutes soliciting customers.  

 

la de’che’ance – decline, fall

[area/industry] demeurer en déclin  

la chute

i knew "la chute".  i would have used that to explain the fall of the dollar, employment, etc. 

i came across "la chute d’eau." is this used as well as "la cascade?"  i also saw "cascade" to mean a "spate" or a "rash." a spate of accidents is a series or a run of them.  the dictionary gave the example  "des annulations en cascade – a spate of cancellations."  it's a word i should know.  cascade exists in English as a noun and a verb, but I’ve never used it.  there’s a dish detergent called “cascade.” 

 

 I know the word “soupconner” but not the following which I’d like u to confirm are commonly used:

la défiance – distrust

avec defiance – suspiciously

la suspicion – suspicion

 

pls confirm that the following are commonly used:

Il m'a planté là et il est remonté dans sa voiture.      

He dumped me there and got back in his car. 

ne reste pas planté là! Don't just stand there!  

Elle s’est plante’e devant la TV

Je me suis planté en maths.      

I messed up my math exam.  

Tu t'es planté: ça fait 128cm, pas 118. 

u've got it wrong: it's 128cm long, not 118.  

 

Views: 60

Reply to This

Replies to This Discussion

First i have a question about this notion : formal language.

- langage familier

- langage courant : I suppose this is called "everyday language"  ?  so I think there are many levels.

- langage soutenu :  I think formal langage is this one.

solliciter

the word is new to me.  the dictionary says u “solliciter info” and “solliciter un emploi."  I think I saw it used to ask for a favor.  I know “asking a favor” as “demander une service." i see there's also "demander une faveur" but i never encountered this.  pls address this as well.    

in english, only educated people use it -- to solicit someone's opinion or ideas.  i've never used it.  it's also seen on signs -- "no soliciting" w regard to prostitutes soliciting customers.  

=> In french it's formal too, but it's very known because of used expressions to write a formal letter to some administrations, to justice system, to school system, ....

"Je sollicite votre bienveillance...."

"Je sollicite de votre part....."

 

la de’che’ance – decline, fall

[area/industry] demeurer en déclin  

la chute

i knew "la chute".  i would have used that to explain the fall of the dollar, employment, etc. 

=> for money, "chute" is used as a noun or as a verb for an important fall, la chute du dollar, le dollar chute.

=> "déclin" is used for something that fall but to mean that it's soon the end, that it won't be better in the future. So it's not used for a money. A money floats up and down.

=> "déchéance" is used is many meanings. For a human decline, when there is no hope. the first meaning is when someone did something very bad, he losts some rights. it's called "déchéance". déchéance de la nationalité : terrorists lost french nationality when they are convicted.

i came across "la chute d’eau." is this used as well as "la cascade?"  i also saw "cascade" to mean a "spate" or a "rash." a spate of accidents is a series or a run of them.  the dictionary gave the example  "des annulations en cascade – a spate of cancellations."  it's a word i should know.  cascade exists in English as a noun and a verb, but I’ve never used it.  there’s a dish detergent called “cascade.” 

=>

"cascade"  is commonly used in french.

"chutes d'eau" is often used as a synonyme of "cascade". But "chutes d'eau" is not only a cascade, it's when a lot of water is falling. In a big thunderstorm, sometimes, there are "des chutes d'eau".

and cascade is used as "spate". Des annulations en cascade is commonly used.

My first thought was "des chutes  en cascade" : this is commonly used in the meaning of a spate of people falling. But when I read that question, I thought "des chutes en cascade" may have a second meaning : une cascade d'eau. a play on the word.

 

 I know the word “soupconner” but not the following which I’d like u to confirm are commonly used:

la défiance – distrust

avec defiance – suspiciously

la suspicion – suspicion

=> yes it's used. more used in formal language. 

pls confirm that the following are commonly used:

Il m'a planté là et il est remonté dans sa voiture.      

He dumped me there and got back in his car. 

ne reste pas planté là! Don't just stand there!  

Elle s’est plante’e devant la TV

Je me suis planté en maths.      

I messed up my math exam.  

Tu t'es planté: ça fait 128cm, pas 118. 

u've got it wrong: it's 128cm long, not 118.  

=> yes "planté"  is commonly used in all these ways

you: 

In french it's formal too, but it's very known because of used expressions to write a formal letter to some administrations, to justice system, to school system, ....

me: it's very common or very widespread

to THE justice system, THE school or educational system 

you: "déclin" is used for something that fall but to mean that it's soon the end, that it won't be better in the future. So it's not used for a money. A money floats up and down.

me: something that "falls" or "drops" but in the sense that it won't rebound.  it's not used for money (omit "a").  money fluctuates or goes up or down.  

you: "déchéance" is used is many meanings. For a human decline, when there is no hope. the first meaning is when someone did something very bad, he losts some rights. it's called "déchéance". déchéance de la nationalité : terrorists lost french nationality when they are convicted.

me: has many meanings or is used in many (different) ways.  it's used to strip a privilege from someone as punishment.  

u're combining 2 tenses in the last sentence.  say "terrorists lose french nationality when they are convicted.  

and it's "he lost" not "he losts" some rights 

RSS

Follow BitterCoffey on Twitter

© 2021   Created by Neil Coffey.   Powered by

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service