French Language

Discuss and learn French: French vocabulary, French grammar, French culture etc.

French Vocab Games app for iPhone/iPad French-English dictionary French grammar French vocab/phrases

For the latest updates, follow @FrenchUpdates on Twitter!

1. Je rencontre rarement quelqu'un qui parle du français.

2. J'entends rarement quelqu'un parlant du français en ville.

3. J'entends rarement quelqu'un parlant du français au travail.

4. J'entends rarement quelqu'un parlant du français sur le train.

5. Ce n'est pas facile de trouver un français qui parle la personne.

Please correct my French sentences. There are mistakes in them.
............................................................................................................................................................................

I rarely meet someone who speaks French.

I rarely hear someone speaking French in town.

I rarely hear someone speaking French at work.

I rarely hear someone speaking French on the train.

It is not easy to find a French speaking person.

Views: 477

Reply to This

Replies to This Discussion

hello Crack1, I correct your sentences :
1.....qui parle francais
2.....parlant français
3...same
4....parlant français dans le train
5...de trouver quelqu'un qui parle français.

I would like to know why you say "on the train" and not "in".
1) Better is : ... qui parle le Français. On parle une langue, donc : on parle le français.
2) same : le français
3) same
4) better : dans le train. Sur le train = really on the train = on its roof
5) Un Français (capital f ...). Your sentence is not quite clear : parler quelqu'un would mean : to talk about someone. If you mean : to talk to = parler à quelqu'un. If you mean : who doesn't speak to someone : qui parle à personne.
je persiste dans ce que je disais, we say in France "je parle français" and not "je parle le français".
Humblement je baisse la tête ...
thank you very much for the answer!
Stella

thank you very much for the answer!

The above has a small error.

In English it is incorrect to start a sentence with a simple letter.
The following is the correct one.

Thank you very much for the answer!

Another important point in English is that you should always write French; never french.

He speaks french. This is wrong.

He speaks French.
The reason is you must start with a capital letter when writing a proper noun.

He is studying physics. ( The subject 'physics' is not a proper noun in English.
He is studying German. ( The word 'German' is a proper noun.)

You know nouns are classified as pronouns, abstract nouns, proper nouns, etc in English.

You are not stella but you are Stella. Because your name is a proper noun.

It is fine to write 'stella' in this forum. This is not an official or rather a place where one should adhere to the grammar rules.

However, even here you should write 'German' not 'german.
You write 'Spanish' not 'spanish'.

Not Mr chirac but Mr Chirac.
Not Mrs carla bruni but Mrs Carla Bruni.
Not 'france' but 'France'.
despite all that, for quick forum posts we'll live with the occasional missing capital letter-- especially in quick english comments discussing the french language
Neil
I would agree with you. Casual writing doesn't have to follow grammar rules.

I guess your mother tongue is French.
Am I wrong?

RSS

Follow BitterCoffey on Twitter

© 2022   Created by Neil Coffey.   Powered by

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service