French Language

Discuss and learn French: French vocabulary, French grammar, French culture etc.

French Vocab Games app for iPhone/iPad French-English dictionary French grammar French vocab/phrases

For the latest updates, follow @FrenchUpdates on Twitter!

The following is a list I've made of French words that resemble English ones but in reality are different. I'm not interested in words (such as "poison" and "six" and "fiancé") that are the same in both languages. Would you care to add to this list?

 

as

assist

attend

bless

bras

but

cave

chair

chat

choir

chose

comment

figure

fin

four

irons

laid

lit

main

met

on

or

ours

pain

pays

pour

sale

sang

seize

smoking

son

sort

store

tape

tire

ton

tour

Views: 2830

Reply to This

Replies to This Discussion

parfait

En anglais, ce nom désigne un type particulier de dessert.
In French, this adjective means "perfect".
Here's a few more: opportunité and éventuellement. These mean "the right moment" and "possibly" respectively.

In standard French as you say, éventuellement isn't used with the same meaning as "eventually" in English. This is a common mistake by both English and French people. (Apparently in Canadian French it can mean "eventually".)

 

Interestingly, though, opportunité is now widely accepted in French to mean the same as "opportunity" in English. So for example, avoir l'opportunité de faire qch = to have/get the opportunity to do sth. This usage is now fairly standard and widespread so I would be reluctant to call opportunité a faux ami as such.

mare

 

En anglais, c'est une jument.

In French, this is a pond or pool. "une mare de sang" = a pool of blood.

 

bide

 

I will bide my time = J'attendrai pour une bonne occasion.

J'ai un gros bide = I have a paunch.

fur

En anglais, c'est la fourrure.
In French, this is "as".
Just for clarity: in French, the word fur is always used in the expression au fur et à mesure, which as a fixed expression means something like "as things go along", "as he goes along", "periodically as..." etc.
I've not seen this phrase before. Would you use it in a (French) sentence, please?
On améliore son français au fur et à mesure de la lecture de ce forum.

dent (indentation)

 

tooth, tine

la bosse. J'ai fait une bosse à sa voiture = I put a dent in his car

lame

 

En anglais, c'est un adjectif qui signifie boiteux.

In French, la lame is a blade.

I would have translated lame by "ennuyeux". But maybe it has several meanings

RSS

Follow BitterCoffey on Twitter

© 2022   Created by Neil Coffey.   Powered by

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service