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That is, followed by "à".

For example: se téléphoner, s'offrir, s'écrire.

I need a list. Why is this so hard to find?

My students need to know when to write:Elles se sont embrassées (with agreement), and when to write: Elles se sont téléphoné (no agreement).

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If the "se" "me" "te" "nous" or "vous" is an indirect object of the verb then there must be no agreement.

If they are the direct object then there will be agreement.

I am sure there will be a few exceptions or grey areas -or perhaps set expressions it may be hard to work out but I operate according to that rule.

If you can find me examples that do not seem to follow that rule I will be happy to take a look.

We all know the grammar; we're just looking for a list of those verbs. How many are there?

Se sourire, se parler, etc. Pronominal verbs of "communication."

I really can't see the point . To me that is like stamp collecting.

Perhaps if you can find  a publication or an online article in French that is directed towards French students (rather than students of French) there may be a list.

PS: Look , I have found this list but I am not sure if it has been classified in the way you are looking for .

http://www.conjugaisonverbe.fr/verbes/liste-verbes-pronominaux.html

If you search a bit  further along these lines

Google: "verbes pronominaux liste" (ie search  with French  search terms) 

you might  come across just what it is you need.

Thanks for your suggestions!

I think all the communication verbs could be « pronominalised », at least with a reciprocal meaning (the reflexive meaning doesn’t seem always possible). « Indiquer à qqn le chemin » can become « s’indiquer le chemin » in « On s’est (mutuellement) indiqué le chemin », however it seems unlikely  that « s’indiquer » would appear in any pronominal communication verbs list. 

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